Children and Adolescents

Paediatric physiotherapists work with children and young people who have conditions which affect physical development, walking, movement, balance, coordination and posture. We also help children who have conditions that affect breathing.

A child's development is important and there are lots of ways you can help them grow and progress. Check out the links below for information about specific conditions. 

Please only use the video appointment link if you have a pre-agreed appointment from Physiotherapy.

If you have used the paediatric physiotherapy service we'd love to know how you got on.

Shoulders

 

Follow the above link to find out more information about common shoulder problems including:

  • Dislocation / Instability

  • Rotator Cuff Related Shoulder Pain (Impingement)

Click the link below to download an exercise sheet for shoulder pain in children. 

The elbow

 

Follow the above link to find out more information about common elbow problems including:

  • bone breaks (fractures)

  • soft tissue injuries

The Wrist and Hand

 

Follow the above link to find out more information about common wrist & hand problems including:

  • bone breaks (fractures)

  • soft tissue injuries

Hips

 

Follow the above link to find out more information about common hip problems including:

  • bone breaks (fractures)

  • soft tissue injuries

You can download an exercise sheet for children with hip pain below

The Knee

 

Follow the above link to find out more information about common knee problems including:

  • Patellofemoral Pain (Anterior knee pain

  • Ligament/cartilage injuries

  • Dislocations

You can download specific information leaflets below

The Ankle

 

Follow the above link to find out more information about common ankle problems:

You can download specific information leaflets below 

Severs Disease


What Is It?

Severs Disease is a common condition seen after rapid growth associated with the adolescent growth spurt, typically 8 – 12 years in girls and 10 – 14 years in boys.

Severs disease is generally painful over the heel bone (growth plate), where the Achillies Tendon attaches. You can sometimes get swelling over this area too. Pain is made worse by regular high impact sports such as repetitive running, jumping, football and gymnastics.

The important thing is not to worry! Although it is called a disease, it is not something that you have caught from somebody and will not last forever.

How is it diagnosed?

History taking and examination are normally sufficient to form a clinical diagnosis. X-rays are generally not required.

However, a simple test known as the squeeze test may be performed where each side of your heel is squeezed, which may be uncomfortable. If this brings on your heel pain then this confirms your diagnosis.

How long will it last?

Pain usually settles within 6 – 12 months but sometimes the pain can take up to 2 years to settle down completely. Children with severs disease will recover completely with no long term problems.

How is it treated?

• Rest from sports/ impact activities

• Ice

• Gel heel pads

• Anti inflammatory medication (always check with your pharmacy/GP)

• A pair of well cushioned shoes

• Stretches as below. In this example, the right leg is the painful leg.





The Neck

 

Click the above link for common neck problems and how to deal with them.

 

It is really important to help your child buy an appropriate bag for carrying their school work and gym kit. Please read the following leaflet to help you make this decision.

The Lower Back

 

Follow the above link to find out more information about common back problems:

You can view specific information about scoliosis below 

Scoliosis


Scoliosis is a condition which can affect children of all ages though typically early adolescence. From the NHS website: The spine twists and curves to one side. Symptoms to look out for are:

  • A curved spine

  • Leaning to one side

  • Uneven shoulders

  • 1 shoulder or hip sticking out

  • Ribs sticking out to one side

  • Clothes not fitting well.

Idiopathic (the most common type), has no known cause and typically becomes apparent between the ages of 10-12 or can become more noticeable through a child’s growth spurt.

Taking part in regular exercise and functional activities can help reduce back pain and can improve overall core stability and strength. Certain activities may need to be avoided if advised by a specialist.

Always contact your G.P if you are concerned your child has a scoliosis or is beginning to develop a curvature in the spine.

Please visit the links below for further guidance.

The Scoliosis Association

The Scoliosis Association for Teenagers





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Harrogate & District NHS Foundation Trust, Lancaster Park Road, Harrogate, HG1 7 SX